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National Federation Of High Schools (NFHS)
Basketball Traveling Rule Cases

NCAA Travel Cases
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TRAVELING - OR NOT

4.44 SITUATION A: A1 attempts to catch the ball while running rapidly. A1 muffs the ball, but succeeds in securing it before it strikes the floor. A1 then begins a dribble, taking several steps between the time the ball was first touched until it was caught. RULING: There has been no violation provided A1, after catching the ball, released the ball to start the dribble before the pivot foot was lifted from the floor. (4-15).

4.44 SITUATION B: A1 attempts a try after ending the dribble. The try does not touch the backboard, the rim or any other player. A1 runs and is able to catch the ball before it strikes the floor. Is this traveling? RULING: No. When A1 recovered his/her own try, A1 could either dribble, pass or try again. There was no team control after the ball was released on a try. (4-12; 4-41).

4.44.2 SITUATION A: Dribbler A1 catches the ball with the right foot touching the floor and then jumps off that foot and alights on both feet simultaneously: (a) with feet parallel; or (b) with one foot in advance. RULING: The position of the feet has no significance, but they must come to the floor simultaneously. In both (a) and (b), it is a violation if A1 pivots on either foot.

4.44.2 SITUATION B: Airborne A1 and A2 jointly grab the rebound and each alights simultaneously on both feet. A1 and A2 each move one foot in attempting to wrestle the ball from each other before realizing they are teammates. A1 lets go and A2 dribbles away. RULING: Legal. There has been no violation as neither A1 or A2 moved their pivot foot while they were in joint control.

4.44.3 SITUATION A: A1 jumps to try for goal. B1 also jumps and: (a) slaps the ball out of A1’s hands; (b) touches the ball but does not prevent A1 from releasing the ball; (c) touches the ball and A1 returns to the floor holding the ball; or (d) touches the ball and A1 drops it to the floor and touches it first after it bounces . RULING: In (a) and (b), the ball remains live. In (c), a traveling violation. In (d), a violation for starting a dribble with the pivot foot off the floor. Since the touching did not prevent the pass or try in (b), (c) and (d), the ball remains live and subsequent action is covered by rules which apply to the situation.

4.44.3 SITUATION B: A1 receives the ball with both feet off the floor and he/she lands simultaneously on both feet without establishing a pivot foot. A1 then jumps off both feet in an attempt to try for goal, but realizing the shot may be blocked, A1 drops the ball to the floor and dribbles. RULING: A1 has traveled as one foot must be considered to be the pivot and must be on the floor when the ball is released to start a dribble. The fact that no pivot foot had been established does not alter this ruling. Page 37 2009-10 NFHS Basketball Case Rule 5.

4.44.3 SITUATION C: A1 receives a pass and establishes the right foot as the pivot. While faking a pass or try, A1 lifts the pivot foot and stands on the left foot alone while undecided as to what to do. Has A1 traveled? RULING: No. Traveling would occur only if A1 begins a dribble or returns the pivot foot to the floor. While in this position A1 may pass, try for goal or call a time-out.

4.44.3 SITUATION D: (a) A1 tosses the ball from one hand to the other while keeping his/her pivot foot in contact with the floor; or (b) A1 throws the ball over the head of B1 and then takes several steps before catching it. RULING: Legal in (a), but a traveling violation in (b). In (b), since the ball did not touch the floor, the tossing and subsequent catch is illegal. (9-4).

4.44.5 SITUATION A: Is it traveling if A1 falls to the floor: (a) while holding the ball; or (b) after being airborne to catch a pass or control a rebound? RULING: Yes in both (a) and (b).

4.44.5 SITUATION B: A1 dives for a loose ball and slides after gaining control. A1 is in a position either on his/her back or stomach. What can A1 do without violating? RULING: A1 may pass, shoot, start a dribble or call a time-out. Once A1 has the ball and is no longer sliding, he/she may not roll over. If flat on his/her back, A1 may sit up without violating. Any attempt to get to the feet is traveling unless A1 is dribbling. It is also traveling if A1 puts the ball on the floor, then rises and is first to touch the ball. (4-44-5b).

4.44.5 SITUATION C: A1 is dribbling when he/she: (a) drops to a position with a knee on the floor and then ends the dribble; or (b) drops one knee to the floor and then stands again while continuing the dribble. RULING: The action in both (a) and (b) is legal. However, if A1 touches a knee to the floor while holding the ball, it would be traveling as A1 has touched the floor with something other than a hand or foot.

4.44.5 SITUATION D: A1 secures possession of the ball with one knee in contact with the floor. May A1 assume a standing position without committing a traveling violation? RULING: It depends on what A1 does. If A1 attempts to stand up while holding the ball, a traveling violation occurs. However, if A1 starts a dribble and then rises, no violation has occurred. Also, A1 could pass, try for goal or call a time-out from that position.

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National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)
Men's Basketball Traveling Rule Cases

NCAA Rules
NFHS Travel Cases
NBA Travel Cases
FIBA Travel Cases
 
A.R. 110. A1 attempts a try at Team A’s basket after having completed the dribble. The try does not touch the backboard, the ring or the flange or any other player. A1 runs and catches the ball before it strikes the playing court. Is this traveling?
    RULING: No. When A1 recovered his or her own try, A1 could either dribble, pass or try again. There is no team control by either team when a try is in flight. However, when the shot clock expires and a try by A1 or a teammate has not struck the ring or the flange, it shall be a violation of the shot-clock rule. (Rule 4-68.1, 4-15.4.c and 9-11.2)
     
A.R. 111. A1, while airborne, catches the ball in an attempt to prevent a live ball from going out of bounds. A1 throws the ball to the floor as his/her momentum causes him/her to land out of bounds. A1 returns to the playing court where he/she:
(1) Recovers the ball; or
(2) Continues to dribble.
The official calls a traveling violation. Is the official correct?
    RULING: No.
    (1) and (2) The official was incorrect in calling a traveling violation because when A1 caught the ball while airborne, he/she had no established pivot foot. When he/she threw the ball to the floor, returned to the floor after being legally out of bounds and was the first to touch the ball, it became a dribble.
    (1) When A1 recovered the ball, the dribble ended.
    (2) A1 is permitted to continue his/her dribble.
    (Rule 4-68, 4-21.2 and 4-21.4.a)
A.R. 112. A1 receives a pass from A2 and comes to a stop legally with the right foot established as the pivot foot. A1 tosses the ball from one hand to the other several times and then proceeds to bat the ball to the floor before A1 lifts the pivot foot.
    RULING: Legal. (Rule 4-68.4.b)
A.R. 113. Is it traveling when a player:
(1) Falls to the playing court while holding the ball without maintaining a pivot foot; or
(2) Falls to the playing court on both knees while holding the ball without maintaining a pivot foot; or
(3) Gains control of the ball while on the playing court and then, because of momentum, rolls or slides, after which the player passes or starts a dribble before getting to his or her feet?
    RULING: (1) and (2) Yes, when the pivot foot is not maintained because it is virtually impossible not to move the pivot foot when falling to the playing floor.
    (3) No. The player may pass, shoot, start a dribble or call a timeout. Once the player has the ball and is no longer sliding, he or she may not roll over. When flat on his or her back, the player may sit up without violating. When the player puts the ball on the floor, then rises and is the first to touch the ball, it also is traveling. When a player rises to his or her feet while holding the ball, it is traveling. When a player falls to one knee while holding he ball, it is traveling if the pivot foot moves.
    (Rule 4-68.6 and 4-68.1)
A.R. 199. A1 attempts to catch the ball while running. A1 fumbles the ball and succeeds in securing it before it strikes the playing court. A1 then begins a dribble, taking several steps between the time A1 first touched the ball until catching it.
    RULING: There has been no violation provided that A1 released the ball to start the dribble before lifting the pivot foot from the playing court after catching the ball.
    (Rule 9-6 and 4-68.4.b)
A.R. 200. A1, after:
(1) Receiving a pass; or
(2) Ending his/her dribble,
A1 jumps into the air on a try for goal, is contested by B1 and since A1 could not get his/her try for goal off, he/she voluntarily throws the ball to the playing court.
In both (1) and (2), A1 is the first to touch the ball.
    RULING: (1) A1 has committed a traveling violation because he/she did not release the ball before picking up his/her pivot foot.
    (Rule 9-6, 4-68.4.b)

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National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)
Women's Basketball Traveling Rule Cases

NCAA Rules
NFHS Travel Cases
NBA Travel Cases
FIBA Travel Cases
 
A.R. 204. A1 attempts to catch the ball while running. A1 fumbles the ball and succeeds in securing it before it strikes the playing court. A1 then begins a dribble, taking several steps between the time A1 first touched the ball until catching it.
    RULING: There has been no violation provided that A1 released the ball to start the dribble before lifting the pivot foot from the playing court after catching the ball. (Rule 9-6 and 4-70.4.b)
     
A.R. 205. A1, after:
(1) Receiving a pass; or
(2) Ending his/her dribble,
A1 jumps into the air on a try for goal, is contested by B1 and since A1 could not get his/her try for goal off, he/she voluntarily throws the ball to the playing court.
In both (1) and (2), A1 is the first to touch the ball.
    RULING: (1) A1 has committed a traveling violation because he/she did not release the ball before picking up his/her pivot foot.
    (Rule 9-6, 4-68.4.b)
    (2) A1’s release of the ball, after being airborne, was the start of a second dribble. When A1 touched the ball, he committed a double dribble violation.

     
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National Basketball Association (NBA)
Basketball Traveling Rule Cases

NBA Rules
NFHS Travel Cases
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FIBA Travel Cases
 

373. Player A1 drives to the basket, gathers the ball early, clearly jumps off one foot and lands simultaneously with both feet (jump stop). What are his options?
Player A1 may jump to pass or shoot but is not allowed to pivot or “step through”.
RULE 10 - SECTION XIII - b
374. Player A1 leaves the floor for a field goal attempt or pass. He is unable to do either because of the close guarding position of Player B1, so he drops the ball to the floor. Is this a violation?
No. He must be the first to touch the ball prior to it touching another player for a violation to occur.
RULE 10 - SECTION XIII - f
375. Player A1 fakes a pass and fumbles the ball out of his control. May he be the first to touch the ball?
Yes. A player may recover a fumble at any time. He may only pass or shoot after recovering the ball. If he recovers the ball without moving his pivot and the ball does not touch the floor, his status remains the same as before the fumble.
RULE 4 - SECTION XVIII
376. Player A1 attempts to pass to Player A2 but tries to stop when a defender steps between them. He is unable to maintain control and the ball comes loose. May he be the first to touch the ball?
No. Player A1’s late attempt to stop his pass is not considered a fumble but a bad pass. Therefore, he may not be the first to touch the ball.
RULE 10 - SECTION III - a
377. Player A1 ends his dribble with both feet off the floor and lands simultaneously with both feet. What are his options?
Player A1 has stopped on the count of one and may pivot with either foot. Once his pivot foot leaves the floor it may not be returned until the ball is released.
RULE 10 - SECTION XIII - b
378. Player A1 ends his dribble with his right foot touching the floor and then hops with his right foot to split two defenders. Is this legal?
No. A player may not step using the same foot from the time he ends his dribble or gains possession of the ball.
RULE 10 - SECTION XIII - h

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Fédération Internationale de Basketball Amateur (FIBA)
Traveling Rule Cases

FIBA Rules
NFHS Travel Cases
NCAA Travel Cases
NBA Travel Cases
 
ART. 25 TRAVELLING

 Statement 
It is not a violation if a player who is lying on the floor gains control of the ball. Similarly it is not a violation if a player who is holding the ball falls unintentionally to the floor. It is also possible that the momentum of a player who is moving at the time he/she falls will cause that player to slide briefly which is also legal. If, however, the player then rolls or attempts to stand while holding the ball, a violation occurs.

Example 1:
A3, while holding the ball, loses balance and falls to the floor.

Interpretation:
A3’s action of unintentionally falling to the floor is legal.

Example 2:
A3, while lying on the floor, gains control of the ball. A3 then
(a) Passes the ball to A4.
(b) Begins a dribble while still lying on the floor.
(c) Attempts to stand while still holding the ball.

Interpretation:
In (a) and (b), the action of A3 is legal.
In (c), a travelling violation has occurred.

Example 3:
A3, while holding the ball, falls to the floor. His momentum causes A3 to slide along the floor before coming to a stop.

Interpretation: